Heads Up on Concussion Safety

Injuries, Neurology, Preventive Service, Tips for Kids Steward Health Care

With fall just around the corner, sports training programs have begun. As fun as our favorite sports can be, they may cause some not-so-fun injuries – especially fall sports like football and soccer.

One of the biggest sporting concerns of the past decade is concussions. Around 300,000 sport-related traumatic brain injuries, most of which are concussions, occur every year in the U.S. The second-leading cause of head injuries in individuals age 15 to 24 is sports. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports the incidents of concussion have doubled in the past decade.

A majority of concussions do not coincide with the loss of consciousness, and often it can be difficult to determine whether an injury resulted in a concussion or not. Concussion and dehydration symptoms present similarly, making differentiation difficult as well.

It is important to note that every person presents concussion symptoms differently. Some key symptoms may be:

  • Headache
  • Dizziness
  • Loss of concentration
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Difficulty with bright lights or loud noises
  • Changes in sleep

If you suspect someone you know has suffered a concussion it is important they be seen by a doctor as soon as possible. In the meantime, brain rest is critical. Rest entails, reducing screen use, e.g., cell phones, TV, and computers. A concussion can take anywhere from one week to months to recover – this will be determined by a physician.

Speak with your daughter or son regarding proper safety precautions surrounding concussion prevention. If your child plays a contact sport, make sure he or she knows always to wear a helmet, and that it is secure and fitted correctly. Try to encourage your child to be more aware of possible injuries and be familiar with the signs of concussions if they do suffer a head injury.

To find a doctor or schedule an appointment, visit Steward DoctorFinder™.